Safari of Browser Forensics: Unearthing Google Chrome, Firefox, and Edge artifacts

Safari of Browser Forensics: Unearthing Google Chrome, Firefox, and Edge artifacts

Google Chrome:

History Database: Chrome keeps track of all visited websites in its History database. You can find this treasure trove of URLs in the user’s profile folder under “AppData\Local\Google\Chrome\User Data\Default\History” on Windows, or “~/Library/Application Support/Google/Chrome/Default/History” on macOS.

Cookies: Cookies, those delightful little snippets of data that websites use to track your browsing activity, are stored in Chrome’s “Cookies” file. You can locate this file in the same folder as the History database.

Cache: Chrome’s cache, which stores temporary files like images and scripts from visited websites, can be found in the “Cache” folder within the user’s profile directory.

Firefox:

Places Database: Firefox stores its browsing history in the “places.sqlite” database, located in the user’s profile folder. On Windows, you can find it in “AppData\Roaming\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles[profile name]” and on macOS, it’s in “~/Library/Application Support/Firefox/Profiles/[profile name]/”.

Cookies and Cache: Similar to Chrome, Firefox also stores cookies and cache data within its profile folder. Cookies are stored in the “cookies.sqlite” file, while the cache resides in the “cache2” folder.

Edge:

WebCache Database: Edge, being integrated with Windows, stores its browsing history in the WebCache database.

You can find this database in the user’s profile folder under “AppData\Local\Microsoft\Edge\User Data\Default\IndexedDB\https_[edge domain]_0.indexeddb.leveldb”.

Cookies: Edge cookies are stored in the “Cookies” file, which is located in the same directory as the WebCache database.

Cache: Edge’s cache, containing temporary internet files, is stored in the “Cache” folder within the user’s Edge profile directory.

Remember, these locations may vary slightly depending on the operating system and version of the browser. But with a little sleuthing, you’ll be able to uncover all the forensic artifacts you need to crack the case wide open!

To learn more you can take the Digital Forensics Course!

Computer Hacking Forensics Investigator Certification!

EC Council Digital Forensics!

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